Too much sugar increases risk of cardiovascular disease, researchers say

19 May 2014        

Sugar

Eating too much added sugar could increase your risk of developing cardiovascular disease, according to scientists.

Researchers claim to have uncovered evidence from 39 clinical trials conducted between 1965 and 2013 suggesting that eating more sugar could trigger changes in blood pressure and cholesterol levels.

Both high blood pressure and high cholesterol are key risk factors for cardiovascular disease.

Previous studies have suggested that eating too much added sugar affects your risk of heart disease because it can lead to obesity.

However this New Zealand study found consuming too much sugar can increase your risk regardless of weight gain.

Both adults and children on average are exceeding their recommended daily sugar intake so it’s important we continue to work as hard as we can to change our behaviour


Victoria Taylor, Senior Dietitian at the British Heart Foundation, said: “This is interesting, but we need more research to confirm these findings.

“Both adults and children on average are exceeding their recommended daily sugar intake so it’s important we continue to work as hard as we can to change our behaviour and meet these targets.

“Cutting down on food and drink with added sugars is a good place to start. Replace sugary drinks with water or sugar-free versions and instead of sweets, biscuits and chocolate, try healthier alternatives like unsalted nuts and seeds, plain popcorn and fresh fruit and vegetables.”