3D imaging to detect abnormal heart muscle thickening

Assessment of physiological and pathological left ventricular remodelling using novel computational analysis of regional geometry

Charlotte Manisty (lead researcher)

University College London

Start date: 01 July 2016 (Duration 3 years)

Supervised by Dr Charlotte Manisty, this Clinical Research Training Fellow is working out why some people develop excessively thick heart muscle in response to stress, putting them at risk of heart failure.

When subjected to stresses, for example, athletic training or exercise, the heart changes its size and thickness. This is usually a normal adaptation to an increased workload. But if people develop an exceptionally thick heart, this can lead to heart failure. The amount the heart changes in response to different stresses varies, and understanding why some people develop excessively thick heart muscle could help prevent further heart problems.

Until now, doctors have used two dimensional measurements to measure heart size and heart muscle thickness. In this project, the fellow will develop a new, more sensitive, automated method that detects heart changes earlier by using three dimensional echocardiograms or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans. They will use this method to study the heart changes in patients and volunteers who are undergoing exercise training, including people who are having heart valve replacements. They will work out if certain factors like ethnicity, diabetes, high blood pressure and exercise can influence these heart changes, and why some people are more prone to excessive heart thickening.

This research will reveal how and when the heart adapts to different stresses by remodelling itself and becoming thicker, and may lead to new risk prediction tools or tailored treatments to prevent abnormal heart thickening.

Project details

Grant amount £197,515
Grant type Fellowship
Application type Clinical Research Training Fellowship
Start Date 01 July 2016
Duration 3 years
Reference FS/16/46/32187
Status In progress

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