Study shows high-salt diet doubles risk of CVD in diabetes patients

22 July 2014        

Salt shaker

Eating too much salt when you have type 2 diabetes could double your risk of cardiovascular disease according to researchers.

The Japanese study looked at the dietary habits of more than 1,580 people with diabetes over eight years to assess the impact that eating a high-salt diet had on their risk of CVD, overt nephropathy, diabetic retinopathy and early mortality.

The findings showed those who consumed an average of 14.8g of salt per day were twice as likely to develop CVD than those who ate an average of 7g a day.

As a nation we are on average eating more than the 6g daily recommended allowance of salt. It is a culture we must work hard to change.


Victoria Taylor, our Senior Dietitian, said: “This study further emphasises just how important it is that we reduce our salt intakes to help protect our hearts. People with diabetes are already at higher risk of CVD but this research suggests eating too much salt could exacerbate that.

“Whether we have diabetes or not, as a nation we are on average eating more than the 6g daily recommended allowance of salt. It is a culture we must work hard to change.

“Most of the salt we eat is already added to the foods we buy. By using front of pack labels, especially ones with colour-coded information, it can help guide us to make healthier choices.”