Are we too sweet on sugar?

4 February 2014        

Sugar

Added sugar is associated with increased risk of death from cardiovascular disease (CVD), researchers have claimed.

A US study used national health survey data to examine added sugar consumption as a percentage of daily calorie intake. Higher levels of added sugar were then linked to an increased risk of death from CVD.

Regular consumption of sugar-sweetened drinks, defined as seven or more servings per week, was also associated with increased risk of dying from CVD.

Victoria Taylor, our Senior Heart Health Dietitian, said: “Sugar is a hot topic in the press at the moment and this study is another reminder to keep an eye on the amount of added sugar in our diet.

“Added sugar can mean extra calories, which can lead to weight gain. So try to keep sweet snacks and fizzy drinks as occasional treats rather than everyday staples.

Added sugar can mean extra calories, which can lead to weight gain.


“However, this research highlights an association, which is not the same as saying sugar causes cardiovascular disease. It’s also important to remember that UK sugar intakes and dietary guidelines are different to those in America.

“Although we’re hearing a lot about sugar at the moment, it’s important not to lose sight of your diet as a whole. Rather than focusing on single nutrients, aim for a balanced diet and pair it with plenty of exercise.”