Research shows increased fitness helps reduce the risk of high blood pressure

18 December 2014        

Two women running New research suggests the fitter you are the less likely you are to develop high blood pressure. 

Researchers in Detroit studied over 57,000 people to see how their fitness levels impacted on their risk of developing hypertension

Participants were put through an exercise stress test and the findings showed those who were fitter had a reduced risk of having the condition or developing it in the future. 

High blood pressure is a major risk factor for coronary heart disease and stroke and around one in three of us have it.

This research found that being fitter meant you were less likely to have high blood pressure or develop it in the future.

June Davison
Senior Cardiac Nurse

June Davison, our Senior Cardiac Nurse, said: “Having high blood pressure can put you at greater risk of coronary heart disease and stroke so it’s vital we do all we can to keep our levels in check.

“This research found that being fitter meant you were less likely to have high blood pressure or develop it in the future.

“However, you don’t need to run marathons to keep your blood pressure at a healthy level.

“Moderate intensity activities that get your heart beating faster, make you feel warmer, and breathe harder - such as going for a brisk walk - can help to reduce high blood pressure and prevent you from developing it. Aim to do at least 150 minutes a week. If it sounds like too much try breaking it up into 10 minute bursts to make it more manageable.”