Research confirms moderate exercise is best for heart attack survivors

13 August 2014        

Two women running

Exercising excessively after surviving a heart attack could put you at greater risk of dying from cardiovascular disease, new research suggests.

The study looked at the relationship between exercise and cardiovascular death in more than 2,300 heart attack patients and found most levels of exercise reduced their risk of cardiovascular death by up to 63%.

However, the findings showed exercising too much, specifically running more than 4.4miles a day or walking briskly for over 6.6miles a day, increased your risk.

If you’ve had a heart attack you may be putting yourself at risk of another if you participate in vigorous exercise


Our Senior Cardiac Nurse, Amy Thompson, said: “We’re often told how beneficial physical activity is for our heart health. However, this study suggests if you’ve had a heart attack you may be putting yourself at risk of another if you participate in vigorous exercise above the recommended amounts – such as running for more than 30 miles per week.

“We shouldn’t be alarmed just yet, the study failed to include people free of heart disease and further research is needed before we can draw any firm conclusions. In the mean time we should all try and build exercise into our daily routines to keep our hearts healthy.

“If you are concerned about exercising with a heart condition, visit your GP for advice.”