Oral health and your heart

28 November 2013        

Sugar

Reducing sugars should be an important health policy target, according to experts in the Journal of the Royal Society of Medicine.

They argued that the link between poor oral health and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease means that policy makers should introduce measures to reduce the sugar found in junk food and fizzy drinks.

Aim for a balanced diet with occasional indulgences.


Tracy Parker, our Heart Health Dietitian, said: “A diet full of junk food can have all sorts of unhealthy consequences. As well as being high in salt and saturated fat, which can increase your blood pressure and cholesterol, processed foods and fizzy drinks are often packed with sugar.

“Too much sugar is bad news for your teeth and gums. Foods containing lots of sugar also tend to be loaded with calories and make you overweight, a risk factor for cardiovascular disease.

“Enjoying a diet rich in fruit and veg, pulses, beans, wholegrains, unsaturated oils and fish leaves less room for sugary snacks. Aim for a balanced diet with occasional indulgences. Not only will you protect your heart, but you’ll look after your teeth and waistline too.”

If you're looking for inspiration for healthy recipes then our Everyday British cookbook will give you lots of ideas for meals that are good to eat and good for your heart.