Al's angina

Al

Al Sloman, a rehabilitation worker, is partially blind and deaf. He was out cycling when he started getting angina pains.

Getting back on his bike

The BHF has been my friend on the end of the line, providing me with information and advice, as well as giving me and my family emotional support.


Al didn't know what the pains were, so kept working on his fitness, thinking that might be the cause. But instead, the pains only got worse.

Al says he had no reason to think he had heart disease as he doesn’t drink or smoke and he's always been active.

He says: "I've done the London to Paris bike ride, the BHF Bike Show ride from London to Birmingham, four marathons, 39 half marathons - the list goes on."

The BHF has been my friend on the end of the line, providing me with information and advice, as well as giving me and my family emotional support.

Since his treatment, Al enjoys running and cycling without any discomfort, and has changed his exercise regime to a lower intensity.

Al was impressed by our informative website and its simple language.

He's signed up to our Heart Matters programme and the Heart Matters magazine. He describes both services as "excellent".

"Keep up the good work. People with any heart condition won't feel alone while the BHF is in existence. Picking up the phone was the best thing I could have done."

What is angina?

Angina is a pain or discomfort felt in your chest, which is usually caused by coronary heart disease. Some feel the pain in their arm, neck, stomach or jaw and experience shortness of breath.

If you have not been diagnosed with angina and experience chest pain, call 999 immediately.

Other people with angina

Many others are diagnosed and struggle with angina. Here are their stories:

Rachel's stent
Len's bypass surgery

Support life saving heart research

BHF Professor Andrew Baker leads a team of scientists aiming to translate discoveries made in the lab into new treatments for people with angina. If his team is successful, Professor Barker's therapy could offer hope to thousands of patients like Al every year. Your donations make those medical breakthroughs happen. Make a donation today to help find new ways of treating angina.

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